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Architecture in the City - San Francisco, California.


Source: cdn.britannica.com


Each city exhibits a unique pattern and design in its overall architecture and it is expected and supposed to have a great influence from their traditions and cultures. Architecture is a vast study including the minute details and patchworks. In this blog, we will be talking about architecture in the city- San Francisco, California.


San Francisco, the city and port, in northern California U.S. is located on a peninsula between the Pacific ocean and San Francisco Bay. It is the cultural and financial centre of the western United States and one of the country's most cosmopolitan cities.


When talking about the architecture of the city, it is not particularly known for any defining architectural style. It is known worldwide for its particularly electric mix of Victorian and modern architecture.


Studies show that a mixture of architectural styles are present in San Francisco and below mentioned are the prominent fifteen styles of architecture present in San Francisco:


1. Queen Anne

2. Gothic Revival

3. Tudor Revival

4. Shingle Style

5. Earthquake Shacks

6. Brick Warehouses

7. Beaux- Arts

8. Mission Revival

9. Art Deco

10. Streamline Moderne



Now we shall see each of these styles in brief:


1. Queen Anne



Source: thoughtco.com


Victorian is the most prevalent type of architecture in San Francisco, it contains a multitude of styles and the most prominent one among that is "Queen Anne", they have ostentatious colours, elaborate with gingerbread trim, bay windows, and the occasional turret.


2. Gothic Revival


Source: media.architecturaldigest.com


This style of architecture is inspired by cathedrals and their ornate windows and spires ( eg: Grace cathedral, San Franciso ).

Gothic revival style of architecture features steeply pitched roofs and pointed arches.


3. Tudor Revival



Source: study.com


This style of "Tutor Revival" is easy to recognize with its distinctive half-timbering: the original Tudors featured exposed wood framing with whitewashed wattles and daub walls.


4. Shingle Style




Source: upload.wikimedia.org


In this style, homes features plain facades covered in shingles. The style was originated in New England but later architects ran around with it around the turn of the century. Architectural historians cite their redwood shingle-clad homes as part of the First Bay Tradition, a precursor to Northern California modernism,


5. Earthquake Shacks